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Wednesday, January 27, 2016

2017 IFLA/OCLC Fellowship


Application for the 2017 IFLA/OCLC Fellowship is currently open. Deadline for submissions is February 12 2017. This program provides early career development and continuing education for library and information science professionals from countries with developing economies. It is jointly sponsored by IFLA and OCLC. Up to five individuals are selected to participate in the intensive four-week Fellowship program. 

View this video to learn more as last year's Fellows share their experiences.

Click here to learn more and download application

Friday, November 13, 2015

OCLC Research publishes 'The Library in the Life of the User'



OCLC Research has published a new compilation, The Library in the Life of the User: Engaging with People Where They Live and Learn, which represents more than a decade of collaborative work studying the information-seeking behaviors of library users.

Compiled and co-authored by Lynn Silipigni Connaway, findings from The Library in the Life of the User articulate the need for the design of future library services to be focused on the library user. The compilation is intended to provide a sequential overview of the findings of user behavior research for librarians, information scientists, and library and information science students and researchers as they think about new ways to provide user-centered library services.

"It is important to think of the library in the life of the user instead of the traditional model of the user in the life of the library," according to Lorcan Dempsey, Vice President, OCLC Research and Chief Strategist. The findings in these studies illustrate how some library user behaviors have changed as new technologies emerge, while other behaviors remain constant.
Among the findings:
  • People associate the library with books and do not consider the library in relation to online resources or reference services.
  • People may not think of using libraries to get their information because they do not know that the services exist, and some of the existing services are not familiar or do not fit into their workflows.
  • The context and situation of the information need often dictate how people behave and engage with technology.
  • Engagement and relationship building in both the online and physical environments is important for the development of successful and effective services.

The Library in the Life of the User includes a collection of work completed in the OCLC Research user studies theme. It represents more than a decade of work with colleagues from The Ohio State University and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and with Jisc, in collaboration with Oxford University and the University of North Carolina, Charlotte.

Click on report here: The Library in the Life of the User: Engaging with People Where They Live and Learn

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

PEW Report - Technology Device Ownership: 2015

pew

A recent report from Pew Research Center on technology device ownership in 2015 states the following:

Today, 68% of U.S. adults have a smartphone, up from 35% in 2011, and tablet computer ownership has edged up to 45% among adults, according to newly released survey data from the Pew Research Center. Smartphone ownership is nearing the saturation point with some groups: 86% of those ages 18-29 have a smartphone, as do 83% of those ages 30-49 and 87% of those living in households earning $75,000 and up annually.

At the same time, the surveys suggest the adoption of some digital devices has slowed and even declined in recent years.

Read full report here:

Friday, October 16, 2015

Google's Massive Book-Scanning Project Is Legal

Article by Joseph Ax
A U.S. appeals court ruled on Friday that Google's massive effort to scan millions of books for an online library does not violate copyright law, rejecting claims from a group of authors that the project illegally deprives them of revenue.
The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York rejected infringement claims from the Authors Guild and several individual writers, and found that the project provides a public service without violating intellectual property law.
The authors sued Google, whose parent company is now named Alphabet Inc, in 2005, a year after the project was launched. They claimed that the scanning illegally deprived them of revenue.
But Google argued that the effort would actually boost book sales by making it easier for readers to find works, while introducing them to books they might not otherwise have seen.
A Google spokesman and a lawyer for the authors both did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Google had said it could face billions of dollars in potential damages if the authors prevailed.
Circuit Judge Denny Chin, who oversaw the case at the lower court level, dismissed the litigation in 2013, prompting the authors' appeal.
Chin found Google's scanning of tens of millions of books and posting "snippets" online constituted "fair use" under U.S. copyright law.
A unanimous three-judge appeals panel said the case "tests the boundaries of fair use," but found Google's practices were ultimately allowed under the law.
"Google’s division of the page into tiny snippets is designed to show the searcher just enough context surrounding the searched term to help her evaluate whether the book falls within the scope of her interest (without revealing so much as to threaten the author’s copyright interests)," Circuit Judge Pierre Leval wrote for the court.
The 2nd Circuit had previously rejected a similar lawsuit from the Authors Guild in June 2014 against a consortium of universities and research libraries that built a searchable online database of millions of scanned works.
Google Books began after the company agreed with several major research libraries to digitize current and out-of-print books from their collections.

Friday, April 24, 2015

 Syncing for Success: Social Media & Mobile Apps: Tips & Tools for Innovative Services

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
11:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Summary:
As the volume of free online resources continues to grow exponentially, so do the challenges faced by librarians and other information professionals in their task of finding, evaluating, and facilitating community access to this free content. This presentation promotes free social media tools and mobile apps and shows how these can be successfully applied in libraries and other working environments. Developed specifically for “info pros” who want to use tech tools to innovate, improve, and add value to services, it focuses on innovative concepts and trends that are rapidly being “mashed up” and adopted in the library world. Learn about tools and apps supporting the latest trends in cloud storage, crowdfunding, ebooks, makerspaces, MOOCs, news aggregation, photo and video sharing, self-publishing, social networking and bookmarking, video conferencing, visualization, and wearable technology.

This presentation can be found on the Computer in Libraries 2015 conference page

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Announcing The Cybrarian's Web Vol 2

Finally I can announce the completion of the second volume of The Cybrarian's Web 2 (TCW2). Similar in purpose, organization, and content to the first version, TCW2 provides in-depth summaries and analysis of free resources on the web and the practical application and implementation of these resources in libraries and other work environments. While the first volume was written as a starter guide to social media tools, catering mainly to the needs of an audience with limited technological knowledge (for example, brief overviews and library use of popular tools such as Blogger, Delicious, Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and YouTube), TCW2  focuses on lesser-known tools successfully implemented by libraries. Another major divergence is the extensive coverage given to ebooks, ebook collections and  ebook readers.

TCW2 also focuses on innovative concepts and trends that are rapidly being mashed up and adopted in the library world. Readers will learn about these in chapters that cover topics such as self-publishing, cloud storage and hosting, crowdfunding, mobile applications (apps), makerspaces, massive open online courses (MOOCs), social news aggregators, social media management services and visualization tools.  Readers are also introduced to wearable technology in the form of Google Glass.

I hope that this book, like the first volume will serve a wide cross section of readers in multiple communities supporting productivity, collegial collaboration, and self-development, and that readers discover its usefulness as a guide and learning tool to innovate, improve, and add value to library services in the digital age.

Learn..Experiment...Share

Order from  the Information Today Bookstore.

Read sample chapter on Information Today website
Read sample chapter on Scribd
Cheryl Ann Peltier-Davis